vintagegal:

Halloween pin-up c. 1950s

vintagegal:

Halloween pin-up c. 1950s

(Source: gravesandghouls)

@9 months ago with 4734 notes

(Source: amaymom)

@9 months ago with 26 notes
Love this

Love this

@10 months ago

(via kgthunder)

@10 months ago with 258 notes
tomcolbieart:

This is the first release of my new project “TRANQUILITY BASE”.

tomcolbieart:

This is the first release of my new project “TRANQUILITY BASE”.

(via fer1972)

@11 months ago with 6354 notes
fer1972:


Trip to the Moon by Begemott
@11 months ago with 442 notes
natgeofound:

A view of Malaga’s cemetery for derelicts of the sea in Spain, March 1929.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic

natgeofound:

A view of Malaga’s cemetery for derelicts of the sea in Spain, March 1929.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic

@11 months ago with 1235 notes
markrosehfx:

Lobo’s Back #1 cover by Simon Bisley

markrosehfx:

Lobo’s Back #1 cover by Simon Bisley

@1 year ago with 22 notes

In Love.

Hand cut Universal Horror, Eelus

(via nevver)

@9 months ago with 1487 notes
natgeofound:

A view of a whale’s fluke as it dives after being harpooned in Point Hope, Alaska, September 1942.Photograph by Froelich G. Rainey, National Geographic

natgeofound:

A view of a whale’s fluke as it dives after being harpooned in Point Hope, Alaska, September 1942.
Photograph by Froelich G. Rainey, National Geographic

@9 months ago with 1289 notes
@10 months ago

odditiesoflife:

Modern Bestiary

Throughout the Middle Ages, enormously popular bestiaries presented descriptions of rare and unusual animals, typically paired with a moral or religious lesson. The real and the imaginary blended seamlessly in these books—at the time, the existence of a rhinoceros was as credible as a unicorn or dragon.

Although modern audiences scoff at the impossibility of mythological beasts, there remains an extraordinary willingness by the public to suspend skepticism and believe wild stories about nature.

Domenico Gnoli (1933-1970) is one of the most neglected illustrators of the 20th century. Born in Rome, Italy, he was an Italian artist, writer and stage designer. Gnoli was an imaginative, intense and technically gifted artist. He is best known for his books Orestes (The Art of Smiling), 1961 and Bestiario Moderno (Modern Bestiary), 1968.

In Modern Bestiary, Gnoli produced an incredible collection of pen and ink illustrations that are intricately detailed and nothing short of amazing. Looking like ‘pop art’, his animal creations look like strange but lovable household pets. Who wouldn’t want a flying cat or rhino-chicken?

sources 1, 2, 3, 4

(via vintagegal)

@11 months ago with 10671 notes
kitomishinsuke:
@11 months ago with 61 notes

fer1972:

And When you loose control by Davit Yukhanyan

@11 months ago with 1154 notes
@12 months ago with 3208 notes